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Member Case Study: Aloxy Leverages Eclipse Foundation Membership to Build its Petro-Chemical Business

At the Eclipse Foundation, we’ve seen companies from all around the world, from different industries, find value in open source software. Aloxy, the subject of our latest member case study, has discovered that adopting open source components helped them focus on the unique aspects of their products, and increase their time to market.

“Our customers like the idea that we’re not reinventing all of the technologies ourselves, and that we’re using and participating in open source projects that are governed by a well-known, independent foundation,” said Glenn Ergeerts, Aloxy’s co-founder and chief technology officer.

Aloxy is an Industrial IoT firm based in Antwerp (Belgium) that primarily works with clients in the petrochemical industry. The company creates infrastructure sensors that monitor the positions of critical valves and send the data back to the Aloxy IIoT Hub for processing and analysis. To build their solutions, Aloxy has adopted two Eclipse IoT projects, Eclipse Hono and Eclipse Ditto.

Aloxy’s open source strategy has proved to be working. “Several large oil and gas multinationals are hosting our software in their private cloud and connecting multiple locations to it,” Ergeerts says. “They feel comfortable enough with our software that they’re willing to connect it to their global architectures. And they’re happy we’re using open source components that can be deployed in a cloud native way without locking them into a specific cloud vendor.”

While there was a learning curve to adopting these technologies, Ergeerts says the decision to leverage stable and secure open source components was a “no-brainer,” and that the company will continue to build on the security, stability, and scalability they have today.

For more insight into Aloxy’s story, read the case study.

To learn more about the benefits of Eclipse Foundation membership, visit our membership page.

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Our member case studies help companies who are considering membership in the Eclipse Foundation understand the business benefits that can be gained.

If you would like to share insight into your experiences and business evolution as an Eclipse Foundation member, please let us know. All Eclipse Foundation members are welcome to participate in our member case study initiative.

To get involved, email marketing@eclipse.org.

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In the spirit of open source, we’re publishing all of our member case studies under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license. As long as you provide attribution according to the terms of the license, you can:
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  • Adapt, transform, and build on the material for any purpose.

Read More Eclipse Foundation Case Studies

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