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The Industrial Open Source Network: Because Open Source Is Integral to IoT

Year after year, surveys conducted by the Eclipse Foundation have showed that most IoT developers leverage open source technologies. In the 2019 Commercial IoT Adoption Survey, for example, 60% of respondents stated that their organization is factoring open source into its IoT deployment plans. This clearly means the dominant IoT platforms in the market will either be open source or based on an open source core.

The Eclipse IoT working group brings together over 45 organizations that believe that open source is integral to IoT. As the market evolves towards digitization and Industry 4.0 becomes a reality, the industry needs to shift towards software, which means it needs to adopt open source. This transition will not be easy. Many organizations with an industrial focus, such as machine manufacturers and industry-specific solution providers, tended to build everything in-house in the past. Traditionally, they have viewed open source with suspicion. This needs to change.

To make that change happen, Eclipse IoT member Pragmatic minds GmbH created the Industrial Open Source Network along with several other German organizations. The aim of the network is to combat misconceptions about open source and promote its adoption in the IoT ecosystem. The network will provide information and even trainings about open source, covering topics such as licensing, intellectual property management and even how to make contributions to open source projects. The members of the Industrial Open Source Network will also provide professional open source support.

For more information, please visit the industrial-opensource.com website.




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