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Welcome!

After leaving Oracle, I planned to start a new blog. I bought this domain name, opened a Blogger account, and then... Life got in the way.

Earlier this week, I started a new job at the Eclipse Foundation. I am now their IoT and Edge Computing Program Manager. What does this entail? Simply working with the rest of the Eclipse IoT Community. There are new projects to incept, new members to recruit, new developers to get in touch with... Part of my job is to get the message out; as such, I will be a frequent sight at industry conferences. I will also start to actually use this blog. I am very excited about this!

For the time being, this place is a work in progress. You can expect improved visuals and actual content soon. Is there something you want me to write about? Please let me know!

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IoT Developer Survey 2019: the Key Trends

Introduction 2019 marked the fifth anniversary of the Eclipse IoT Developer Survey. This edition is without a doubt the best yet. More than 1700 persons participated; that's about three times more than last year!

As usual, the aim of the survey was to look at the IoT landscape to understand the key trends for people building IoT solutions and identify the relevant technologies and standards. You can find the results of our previous surveys on the Eclipse IoT website.
Executive Summary Our key findings for this edition of the survey are:
IoT drives real outcomes today.  65% of respondents are currently working on IoT projects or will be in the next 18 monthsAWS, Azure, and GCP are the leading IoT cloud platformsIoT developers mostly use C, C++, Java, JavaScript, and PythonMQTT is still the dominant communication protocol leveraged by developersThe Eclipse Desktop IDE is the leading IDE for building IoT applications  A deeper look at our key findings IoT drives real outcomes today O…

The Eclipse IoT MQTT Sandbox Is On the Move!

For many years, the Eclipse Foundation has offered an MQTT sandbox to the IoT developer community. That sandbox was maintained by Foundation staff and was running on Foundation infrastructure. The goal was to encourage and facilitate the evaluation of Eclipse Paho and Eclipse Mosquitto, and to foster interoperability among MQTT implementations. Today, I have the pleasure to announce the deployment of a new community-run MQTT sandbox to replace it.

What will change? — In a user perspective, just the domain name. The old sandbox was available at iot.eclipse.org. The new one will be available at mqtt.eclipse.org. As before, port 1883 will be used for standard connections and port 8883 for connections over TLS.

What will happen — For the time being, the DNS record for mqtt.eclipse.org points to the old sandbox. On July 16 2019 at 10:00 EDT, the IT team will switch that DNS record to the new one.

The admins for the new sandbox will only be able to generate the digital certificates for TLS c…

A Virtual Event With a Focus on the Real World

April 9, 2020 was supposed to be a big day for the Eclipse IoT, Eclipse Edge Native and Eclipse Sparkplug communities. We were planning to gather in a room of the San Jose Convention Center to have a full day of presentations and networking. Unfortunately, that event got cancelled due to the Coronarivus pandemic.

Given we had such a strong speaker lineup, we decided to organize a virtual event instead. The Eclipse Virtual IoT and Edge Native Day will be held on May 28, 2020 from 10:00 to 16:00 Eastern Daylight time. The theme for the day is "Our Open Source Ecosystem Means Business". Each of the talks we have focuses on real-world technology that you can use right away to build IoT and Edge Computing solutions.

I will have the pleasure to kick start the day with a session describing how you can leverage our most popular IoT and edge computing projects. I will also cover the latest developments in our three working groups.

Please visit the event's website for more details…